Denying Vaccines: Personal Choice or Public Health Threat?

Last year, 187 Americans contracted the measles, and in 2014 there have already been over 70 cases confirmed across the country. This is a disease which can be easily prevented through immunizations; which was thought to be eradicated in the U.S. in 2000.

As a mother-to-be, I was nervous to learn that children are not able to receive the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine until age one – thus making babies and toddlers particularly susceptible to the disease during an outbreak. Of the twenty current measles cases in New York, about half have been identified in children – seven …read more

The Health and Life Outcomes of De Facto Segregation

A photo of the Baltimore National Aquarium taken July 3, 2010 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My maternal family’s roots have been planted in Baltimore for many generations. I grew up believing that Baltimore is at the center of the universe and my love for this city reflects my reverence for my hometown’s unique attributes.

Despite the crack epidemic hitting the city pretty hard, making drug pushers and addicts a mainstay of my commute to school, the abandoned row houses leaving a blight on the landscape, and gentrification which led to the demolition of public housing units, I still love Baltimore. …read more

A Custody Battle that Nearly Took Justina’s Life

Hospital (Photo credit: morrissey)

Earlier this year, in her New Life Support Debate blog post, Julia shared the plight of a pregnant woman who was forced to stay on life support in order to keep her baby alive, a decision that would cost the family additional pain, and rendered her baby so unhealthy that he eventually died. The story that I will comment on does by no means depict the same circumstances, but it mirrors similar concerns of those outlined in post: The New Life Support Debate.

This month, 15-year-old Justina will be returning to the care of Tufts …read more

Increasing the Federal Minimum Wage: A Meaningful Investment

Raise the Minimum Wage (Photo credit: CT Senate Democrats)

There’s a lot of talk about increasing the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 by 2016 – including its impact:

Approximately 16.5 million low-wage workers would directly benefit from the proposed increase Roughly 900,000 people living below the poverty line would move above the poverty threshold Both low-and-middle-income families’ incomes are projected to rise, 2.8% for the poorest families to .4% for middle-income families Employment would be reduced by about 500,000, or .3% of total employment Wealthy families with an average income of $180,000 can expect a .4%, or …read more