The Big Deal Around Obesity Disproportionately Affecting Minority Populations

(Photo credit: Malingering)

In honor of National Minority Health Month, the WellPower Blog team continues to raise awareness on health disparities affecting racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S., including the ways social determinants affect health, specifically obesity.

Obesity is defined as a person weighing at least 20% more than they should for their height – and it disproportionately affects minority populations, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health:

African American women are 80% more likely to be obese than Non-Hispanic White women Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders are 30% times more likely …read more

Increasing Prevention and Avoiding the ER

In 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that the average life expectancy for black males is approximately 64 years old, compared with 73 years for white males. Racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely to have access to the preventive care they need to stay and are more likely than white Americans to suffer from chronic conditions, prompting the theme for this year’s Minority Health Month; “Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity.”

Luckily, 10.2 million Latinos, 6.8 million African Americans, nearly 2 million Asian and Pacific Islanders, and over a half million American Indians and Alaska natives …read more

Dismantling Barriers to Health, One Word at a Time

Emergency Room (Photo credit: Mark Coggins)

I recently read an article about Deisy Garcia, a woman who filed a police report saying her husband had assaulted her and that she feared for her life. That report, filled out in Spanish, sat untranslated — and without follow up – for months until she and her two children were murdered.

No human being should be denied protection from bodily harm due to language barriers and cultural incompetence. Deisy Garcia’s death could have been prevented had she been given the protection she sought. Her health, well-being, and ultimately her life was taken …read more

Rx: 1 Inhaler + Heat…Supporting Preventative Health

Pharmacy Rx symbol (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“I’m sorry,” is all the doctor could say at that point. The patient would have to have surgery–an amputation…all because he didn’t have access to medical care before diabetes took over.

According to the Center for Disease Control, African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islander Americans are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes than the rest of U.S. population. These racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes due to poverty, lack of access to health care, …read more

Commemorating National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month, an opportunity to raise awareness about health disparities affecting racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S. The WellPower blog team is committed to raising these issues to public consciousness, and writing about the ways that social determinants like education, housing, and jobs affect health.

Throughout April, we will be blogging about issues that are aligned with this year’s Minority Health Month theme; Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity. This brings to mind the old saying that ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.’ Although there are many …read more

After Soldiers Protect Us, Who Protects Them?

This piece by Stephanie Moore is re-posted from the Eyes Wide Open Blog: http://eyeswideopen.org/soldiers-protect-us-protects/

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I recently read a disturbing article in the Baltimore Sun that quoted a Veterans Administration report that there is an average of 22 suicides a day by veterans. 22 a day. Where are we as a nation if we cannot help and support those who risk their lives to protect us?

The website, Veterans and PTSD shares these statistics from a major study done by the RAND Corporation (full pdf of study), the Congressional Research Service, the Veterans Administration, and the US Surgeon General.[i]

at …read more

The Shriver Peaceworker Fellows Program Gives Back to Baltimore

“Peace Corps Volunteers, stay as you are—be servants of peace; work at home as you have worked abroad—humbly, persistently, intelligently. Serve your neighborhoods. Serve your cities. Serve the poor. Join others who serve. Serve…Serve…Serve…that’s the end. That is the challenge. For in the end it will be the servants who save us all.”

– Sargent Shriver, Peace Corps First Director

Kennedy and Johnson greeting Peace Corps volunteers, 1962 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The WellPower Blog is committed to creating a healthier nation by lifting up community involvement, including drawing attention to local organizations striving to end …read more