Nature Deficit Disorder: It’s a thing

Cross-posted from Nature Deficit Disorder – It’s a Thing– UNspOILed. Read original post here.

View from Buzzard Rock in George Washington National Forest. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I recently returned from a three day backpacking trip in a remote area of the George Washington National Forest. It was a much needed vacation from my urban-focused life, allowing me to reconnect with nature, and helping ward off symptoms of Nature Deficit Disorder. Yes, that is a thing.

Don’t get me wrong, I love living in the city, and actually prefer it to a rural or suburban lifestyle. But as someone who has …read more

Racism is a Public Health Issue

Los Angeles Clippers logo (1984–2010) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By now, unless you have been living under a rock, you are aware that the NBA Commissioner announced that in addition to a lifetime ban from any business with the Los Angeles Clippers and $2.5 million fine, he is pushing to force current owner, Donald Sterling, to sell the team over his racist remarks.

When the news broke a few weeks ago, besides thinking that it was incredulous that Donald Sterling actually believes that his comments were not racist, the other immediate thought that crossed my mind was:

I feel sorry …read more

Increasing Prevention and Avoiding the ER

In 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that the average life expectancy for black males is approximately 64 years old, compared with 73 years for white males. Racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely to have access to the preventive care they need to stay and are more likely than white Americans to suffer from chronic conditions, prompting the theme for this year’s Minority Health Month; “Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity.”

Luckily, 10.2 million Latinos, 6.8 million African Americans, nearly 2 million Asian and Pacific Islanders, and over a half million American Indians and Alaska natives …read more

Dismantling Barriers to Health, One Word at a Time

Emergency Room (Photo credit: Mark Coggins)

I recently read an article about Deisy Garcia, a woman who filed a police report saying her husband had assaulted her and that she feared for her life. That report, filled out in Spanish, sat untranslated — and without follow up – for months until she and her two children were murdered.

No human being should be denied protection from bodily harm due to language barriers and cultural incompetence. Deisy Garcia’s death could have been prevented had she been given the protection she sought. Her health, well-being, and ultimately her life was taken …read more

To Smoke or Not to Smoke (At Age 18): That is the Question

As you may know, during the month of February the WellPower blog team has been considering the pros and cons of raising the legal age of cigarette smoking from 18 to 21. Our fellow colleagues at Campaign Consultation weighed in to let us know what they think about the Maryland Smoking Age debate.

I don’t think that the legal age to smoke should be raised from age 18 to age 21. Adults should continue to make decisions for themselves and deal with the consequences accordingly. – Adiyah Ali

 

 

 

 

 

I think smoking is a dangerous habit, …read more

Legally Responsible

 

its hard keeping this one on one hand and the camera on the other. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Senator Jennie M. Forehand (D-District 17) is retiring this year and her new bill is evidence she wants to end her tenure with a bang. Sen. Forehand is introducing a bill that would further restrict young adults in Maryland from purchasing cigarettes by three years – raising Maryland’s legal smoking age to 21.

Advocates for this bill are likely to argue the severe health detriments caused from first and second-hand smoke warrants such a law:

Pinpointing cigarette smoking as the leading …read more

The Healing Aspects of Rhythm & Dance – Tackling Health Disparities among African-American Men

KevDancer

Health disparities are most prevalent among marginalized communities, including communities of color. African-Americans historically have been barred from accessing health care or have been violated instead of receiving care (think Tuskegee Experiment).

African-American men, in particular, have a well-grounded fear or mistrust of modern medicine because of the aforementioned systemic disparities that exists within the African-American community.

However, just because doctors’ offices often will not have many African-American men in the waiting rooms ready to receive preventive care, this does not mean that they are not finding alternative ways to ensure that they remain healthy and receive the healing that …read more

Resolve to be Healthy and ‘Well’thy

New Years Eve in Central Park (Photo credit: Hans J. Hansen)

Exercise regularly.

Run a marathon.

Eat less red meat.

If you are like me and millions of other Americans, a variation of one of the above statements probably at one time or another have been included in your “New Year’s” resolutions.

Why do we often wait until the end of one year to resolve to live healthier and ‘well’thier next year?

I think that we feel safe in making resolutions because we do not hold ourselves accountable – our resolutions become a part of our personal “wish” list …read more

Give Thanks and Raise Your Voice for Health Equity

For many Americans, Thanksgiving is synonymous with family and food. For me, it is a reminder of one Thanksgiving in particular when my aunt began experiencing shortness of breath and went to the emergency room. Doctors did a series of tests and then sent her home.

Photo of Thanksgiving day dinner. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A few days later she was diagnosed with Stage 3 Cancer. It was a shock to the whole family, but none of us felt that it would be a death sentence. Perhaps we were optimistic at best or disillusioned at worst. We went on and …read more

Helping Our Heros: Standing Up to PTSD

It’s been almost a year since the horrific incident in Newtown, Connecticut that resulted in the loss of 20 children and 6 teachers. Despite the months that have passed, the psychological trauma that accompanied the shooting is still very real for first responders and families of the victims.

Thomas Bean, one of the first officers to respond to the Newtown shooting, is living with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). “That day killed me inside.” He recalls, explaining that he continues to have flashbacks, wake in tears, and suffer paranoid delusions that people are trying to kill him.

Due to Thomas …read more